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Stuart Brothers Collection Now Available


About a month and a half ago, GBB reported that the Old-Time Tiki Parlour was at work producing a CD and DVD set on the Stuart Brothers. Well, that collection is now available, as you can plainly tell by the video above.

Trevor and Travis Stuart were renowned for their banjo-fiddle duets until Trevor's tragic death in March last year. The previous May, however, Tiki Parlour founder David Bragger recorded the duo for what has turned out to be the brothers' final release. The CD/DVD set contains 23 tunes played in their traditional North Carolina style.

Right now, the Tiki Parlour is running a sale, so you can pick the Stuart Brothers set up for $20.

It's also worth noting that the Tiki Parlour also recently released The Skeleton Keys collection, featuring Tricia Spencer and Howard Rains, along with Charlie Hartness on ukulele, Nancy Hartness on guitar and Brendan Doyle on banjo. The group plays 17 tunes that are accompanied by a full-color, 40-page booklet of illustrations by Spencer and Rains.

David Bragger through the Old-Time Tiki Parlour is producing some of the best old-time music collections available today. Each release is handsomely packaged and provides excellent sound and video quality. If you haven't already, I urge you to check out the online shop at oldtimetikiparlour.com/shop and support this endeavor.

Now, if only the Tiki Parlour would release these albums on vinyl ...

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