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Vinyl Hunter, Part 5: The Young Fogies

Today I received a new addition to my old-time vinyl collection: The Young Fogies. This double LP compilation was produced by Ray Alden and released in 1985 on Heritage Records, based in Galax, Virginia.

The album features 41 tracks by the top old-time groups performing at the time, from veterans like the New Lost City Ramblers and Highwoods String Band to up-and-comers such as the Indian Creek Delta Boys and the Horse Flies. You have household names (well, in old-time households, at least) such as Art Rosenbaum, Brad Leftwich, Pat Conte, Alan Jabbour, Mac Benford, Bruce Molsky, Doc Watson, Paul Brown, Richie Stearns and so many more.

Red Mules and Dan Gellert on one side.
Perhaps what excites me most about this compilation is the Ohio connection. Between the first three sides, there are four Ohio-based performers. They are:
  1. The Hotmud Family playing "Take Me Back to My Old North Carolina Home," featuring Rick Good on banjo and vocals. 
  2. The Rhythm Gorillas playing "My Eyes Grow Dimmer Each Day," with Kerry Blech on banjo-mandolin, Joe LaRose (composer of "Winder Slide") on fiddle and vocals, Lynn Frederick and Beth Braden on guitar and vocals (both also played sometimes with the Red Mule String Band), and Larry Miller on bass. 
  3. The aforementioned Red Mules playing "Blind Steer in a Mudhole," with Jeff and Susie Goehring on fiddle, Rick Goehring banjo, Judy Sacks on mandolin and Howard Sacks on guitar.
  4. Dan Gellert playing "Old Bangum" on banjo. He's listed as living in Indiana, but he's an Ohio guy now.
I've been wanting to get this album on CD for a long time, but them I found it for sale on Discogs for a dollar more than I would have paid for the CD on Amazon. Unfortunately, the album is missing the inserts, so I may try to track those down somehow. If you have any leads, let me know in the comments!

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